X

Buffalo-Riding Ceremony in Cambodia

The Buffalo-Riding Ceremony is held every year, in the Cambodian village of Virhear Sour, Kandal province. The tradition of this even goes back 70 years and it marks the end of the Festival of the Dead. It is also a way to honor the Neakta Preah Srok pagoda spirit.

After the race is over, the buffaloes are auctioned off to the highest bidders.

Photos by Reuters

via People.com.cn

buffalo-racing

Read More »

Fish Need Healthcare Too

I’m sure that’s what Patit Paban Halder thought to himself when he decided to open up a fish hospital in the comfort of his own home, in India.

The Fish Hospital of Chandannagore, India, is the only one of its kind. Halder, together with his wife and son, has set up a 32-aquarium facility where they observe and treat sick ornamental fish. The fish doctor does rounds, takes blood sample, checks them for fungus and bacteria and even gives the tiny fish injections.

I don’t know how many of his patience actually make it out of the hospital, but the mere effort of trying to save them is worth my respect.

Photos by DESHAKALYAN CHOWDHURY/AFP/Getty Images

via LIFE

fish-hospital

Read More »

Olympic Babies Compete in Crawling Race

They’ve only been born for a year and they’re already competing in sporting events. No wonder they’re called Olympic Babies.

Babies born on August 8, known as Olympic Babies, take part in a sporting competition that fits them like a diaper, a crawling race.  The race took place on August 6, 2009 in Beijing, to commemorate a 1 year anniversary since the Olympic Games held in the Chinese Capital.

via China.org

baby-race

baby-race2

baby-race3

baby-race4

The Living Bridges of Cherrapunji

It might sound like an exaggeration, but the root bridges of Cherrapunji are indeed alive. Unlike most parts of the world, these bridges are grown, not built.

Known as the wettest place on Earth, Cherrapunji is home to some of the most amazing plants. One of these is the Ficus elastica tree, a sort of rubber tree that grows a ind of secondary roots from higher up in the trunk. The War-Khasis, a local tribe, noticed this plant and realized its potential.

Using hollowed-out betel nut trunks, the tribesmen are able to direct the roots in whatever way they like. When the roots grow all the way across a river, they are allowed to return to the soil, and over time, a strong bridge is formed. It takes up to 10-15 years for a root bridge to develop, but it becomes stronger with each passing year and are known to last for centuries.

Boulders and stones are placed among the rubber tree roots for an easier crossing. The living root bridges of  Cherrapunji are incredibly sturdy, able to sustain more than fifty people at a time.

via rootbridges

root-bridges

root-bridges2

root-bridges3

root-bridges4

root-bridges5

root-bridges6

root-bridges7

Chinese Chef Makes World’s Longest Noodle

Li Enhai, a talented cook from China, insured himself a spot in the Guinness Book of Records after  making a 2,852 meters long noodle, with just one kilogram of flour. In the photos, you can witness his noodle stretching technique, at a hotel opening, in Keshikten, northern China, on July 29.

Photos by Xinhua/Sun Guoshu

via People.com.cn

longest-noodle

longest-noodle2

longest-noodle3

The Bees Masters

In order to show how intimate they are with bees and as proof of their apiculture supremacy, a couple of bee keepers covered themselves with bees.

On July 16, in Ning’an City, northern China, Li Wenhua and Yan Hongxia, two passionate bee-keepers, pulled-off a stunt many would consider insane. Using the queen-bee as bait, the two managed to cover themselves with over 10,000 bees.

Photos by Xinhua/Zhang Chunxiang

via People.com.cn

bee-keepers

bee-keepers2

bee-keepers3

A True Hand-Made Flag

If you thought you were going to see a hand-sown flag, then I’m going to have to disappoint you, but this is something way cooler.

The “left behind children” of migrant workers  went to work in China’s larger cities or abroad, together with volunteers from the University of Science and Technology, have made a 60-square-meters flag of China, using their hand imprints. The artwork was unveiled at Lintou middle-school, Hashan county, on July 21, 2009.

This is was their way of celebrating the 60th anniversary of the People’s Republic of China.

via China.org

hand-made-flag

hand-made-flag2

hand-made-flag3

hand-made-flag4

Too Many People, Too Little Water

No, I’m not talking about the shortage of drinking water in third world countries around the world, that’s what the Dirty Water Campaign is for.

This time I’m talking about…let’s call it fun-water shortage. A massive heat-wave hit China these last few days, and temperatures soared to an alarming 40 degrees Celsius. So what were the poor Chinese people to do, under these circumstances? Find a place to cool of, of course, and what’s better than a swim at the local swimming pool, right?

Well, that’s just not the case for the people of Nanjing, who barely had enough room to tread water at this over-crowded swimming pool. The Daily Mail thinks this might just be the most crowded swimming pool in the world and I tend to agree. But then again, what do you expect in a country with a population of over one billion?

More swimming pools maybe? Just a thought…

crowded-pool

crowded-pool2

crowded-pool3

crowded-pool04

The Zipper Pond of Taiwan

An artistically designed pond that looks like it could be zipped up at any time.

Designed by renowned Taiwanese sculptor Ju Chun, the Zipper Pond has become one of the most popular attractions at the Juming Museum, outside Taipei.  It does look absolutely amazing…I mean I’ve seen some beautiful ponds in my time, but a zipper pond? That’s special.

via Crooked Brains

photos by JT

zipper-pond

zipper-pond2

zipper-pond3

zipper-pond4

zipper-pond5

zipper-pond6

Cool Coffee-Making Manga Robot

This isn’t some kind of coffee filter designed to look as a robot. This thing really makes coffee just like we humans do.

Designed by Clockwork,  a Japanese dude who’s into manga and robotics, the coffee-making robot uses 20 digital KRS-788HV servos, a servo motor, both controlled by a PCB located in its head. The photos don’t say much about this little Japanese coffee making robot, but you can see it in action if you scroll to the video at the bottom.

Also head over to clockwork.shikisokuzekuu.net for more pics and info (if you speak Japanese).

via Geek Alerts

coffee-making-robot

coffee-making-robot2

coffee-making-robot3

coffee-making-robot4

coffee-making-robot5

coffee-making-robot6

coffee-making-robot07

coffee-making-robot08

Tokyo’s Real-Life Gundam at Night

We’ve already posted some photos of the completed life-size RX78 Gundam, during the day, now we though you might enjoy seeing it in action at night.

Just like the Japanese said, the real-life Gundam in Odaiba’s Shiokaze Park has lights radiating from various body-parts, which make it look way much cooler when the sun sets. Check it out:

via Pink Tentacle

japan-gundam

japan-gundam2

japan-gundam3

japan-gundam4

japan-gundam5

japan-gundam6

japan-gundam7

japan-gundam8

The Power of Yoga

Everyone keeps telling me about the beneficial effects of practicing Yoga, but this is too much.

This isn’t the first time we’ve seen what Yoga can do for older people, but that doesn’t make these photos any less impressive. I was around five or six the last time I was able to bring my foot up to the tip of my nose, and this guy puts his feet behind his back with ease, at over fifty years of age. I really have to start practicing Yoga!

via Moobol

chinese-yoga

chinese-yoga2

chinese-yoga3

chinese-yoga4

chinese-yoga5

chinese-yoga6

chinese-yoga7

Harbin Snow Sculpture Festival

I have to be honest and start by saying I’m a huge fan of winter and all that it implies, snow, ice, cold weather, the whole enchilada, so I guess I was a little subjective in picking this piece over others. But even you sun worshipers have to admit that these snow sculptures, especially the castles are simply amazing.

These were all sculpted in blocks of snow and ice, during the Harbin International Ice and Snow Sculpture Festival, in China by the most talented sculptures in the world. The festival dates back to 1963 and is one of the four largest ice and snow festivals, along with along with Japan’s Sapporo Snow Festival, Canada’s Quebec City Winter Carnival, and Norway’s Ski Festival.

harbin.jpg

Read More »

The power of Chinese massage oil

Lucky for me, I’m not very big on Chinese food, or any other spicy cuisine for that matter, I don’t know how my throat could withstand the power of that acid-like sauce. Frankly I can’t even conceive anybody would use that on their food, that stuff makes Mexican chilly look like baby food.

if you’ve ever tried anything like this please leave your thoughts, I’m really curious if Chinese hot sauce is as hot as it looks.

UPDATE: According to one of our readers the red substance is actually some kind of oil and it is not eatable. Sorry for the mix-up, my Chinese is not very good.

KaraTEA

As you all know, Chinese are very serious when it comes to their historical legacy, their centuries old customs and traditions, so it comes as no surprise that even though it’s rapidly becoming one of the most industrialized nations in the world they still honor their forefathers by performing ancient ceremonies.

Avery good example is this Cin dynasty traditional ceremony, performed in the city of Hangzhou. Progress is great but history is fascinating.

Page 22 of 23« First...10...1920212223