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French Engineer Converts Old Cars into DIY Poor Man’s Teslas

French engineer Marc Areny didn’t let his financial status get in the way of owning a Tesla – he simply built a DIY version for himself.

A resident of Romania since 2011, Marc was driven by the idea of making “an electric car that anyone could afford, not just elites.” So he started off with Romania’s national car, the low-cost 2005 Dacia Logan by Renault, and got rid of all the parts that worked on petrol. Instead, he replaced them with batteries and an electric motor. The result was a reliable and fast vehicle that does the job pretty well, albeit without all of Tesla’s bells and whistles – touchscreens and other gizmos.

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The Trovants of Costesti – Romania’s Unique Growing Rocks

When I first read about trovants, I couldn’t believe they were real. They sounded like objects Captain Kirk and his crew would discover on an alien planet. Strange rocks that grow when it rains and move from one place to another without any assistance. Totally sci-fi, right?

As I kept reading about them, I discovered that trovants aren’t a part of science fiction, they are just an amazing geological phenomena. These stones seem to grow as if they are alive, even though they’re not. They are found in the small Romanian village of Costesti. The word ‘trovant’ is a synonym for the German term “Sandsteinkonkretionen” (try saying that really fast), which means ‘cemented sand’.

Cemented sand – that’s a strange name for a rock, isn’t it? But that’s what trovants are – spherical shapes of sand that appeared on earth after powerful seismic activity. In fact, the earthquakes that brought these strange rocks into existence are said to have occurred 6 million years ago. Trovants grow when they come into contact with water. Stones as small as six to eight millimeters end up as large as six to ten meters. Some of them even move on their own. When cut, trovants reveal spherical and ellipsoidal rings, similar to tree trunks.

Trovants-of-Costesti

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Giant Mobile Is Made of Recycled Phones

A giant Nokia mobile phone has appeared in one of the biggest squares in Cluj, Romania, as part of the Planet Report Environmental and Film Festival.

Cluj is probably the most beautiful city in Romania, and I’m glad I finally get the chance to mention it in one of my posts. The first edition of the Planet Report Environmental and Film Festival aims to point out today’s environmental issues, and get the public and local authorities to take them more seriously.

As part of this eco-festival, local artists were asked to create various artworks out of waste. The most popular piece, so far, was a giant Nokia mobile phone, make of dozens of recycled mobiles, old keyboards and other computer parts.

 

 

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The Blood Fountains of Bucharest

Hemophilia is a serious condition,and over 2,000 Romanians suffer from it. To draw some attention to the hardships the 2,000 Romanians suffering from this disease, have to go through every day, the Romanian Association for the Problems of Hemophilia colored the water fountains, in the center of Bucharest, bloody red.

Passers-by did in fact notice the red water flowing in the fountains, but it’s going to take a lot more than this to inspire them to help hemophilia victims.

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Lenin Was Never This Sweet

The famous Communist leader Vladimir Ilic Lenin is still praised by some, but his doctrine is hated by most. That didn’t stop a Romanian artist from making a sweet replica of him and placing it on a pedestal.

Artist Ioana Ciocan hoped her countrymen would be able to get past their prejudices and horrible memories and accept Communism as part of Romanian history. On January 26, the birthday of former Romanian dictator Nicolae Ceausescu, she mounted a 3-meter-tall statue of Lenin on a pedestal, in the Free Press Square, a place closely linked to the Romanian anti-communist revolution.

The giant replica was made of chocolate, rice and candy, and was on display for a single day. Unfortunately, her artistic effort was considered an insult to the martyrs of the Romanian revolution of 1989.

As a Romanian, I can’t say I’m that insulted by Ioana Ciocan’s gesture, but then again, I was only 5 years old when people fought and died for freedom. I am however insulted by the ugliness of the sweet statue.

Chocolate-Lenin-statue

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