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Embroidered Bread – The Latest Trend in Food Art

It may seem strange, but embroidered Wonder Bread can be used as regular paintings, as it can last for years.

Catherine McEver is well known in the odd art world, particularly for her Wonder Bread creations. Her latest artworks are embroidered slices of Wonder Bread that look like famous paintings (Van Gogh’s ‘Starry Night’, for example). They might look silly, but these things are pretty difficult to make, considering how fragile Wonder Bread is. Just like paintings, these Embroidered slices can be hung on a wall,  and will last for years.

Check out more of Catherine’s bizarre artworks on her blog, StuffYouCantHave.

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Make Art, Not War

I guess it’s true what they say, guns really don’t kill people, they can actually be used to create original works of art.

Come May 21, The Rusian city of Perm will be hosting an important exhibition of modern Ukrainian art, called YAKSCHO. It aims to reflect the situation in this country: productively unstable, full of contradictions, promises, hopes and disappointments, bursts of protest and creative energy.

One of the most interesting displays at YAKSCHO will definitely be the shot-up BMW. A local shooters group was asked by the Museum of Modern Art, in Perm, to take part in an unusual, but fun shooting session. Participants were promised a BMW X5 to shoot at, but in the end they were happy to empty their guns into an older model.

Volodymyr Kuznetzov, the man behind this unusual art project, decorated the car with flowers and other ornaments, marked with nail polish crosses, but the shooters, weren’t really able to follow the pattern. Still he was pleased with the final result and believes his shot-up BMW will be a hit when the exhibition opens.

via ilipin

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The Art of Bones, by Francois Robert

Francois Robert creates iconic shapes, using dozens of real human bones. He spends entire days on his knees, but the results are truly exceptional.

Francois has always been fascinated by skeletons, but it wasn’t until a day, in the mid 1990s, that he came face to face with one. He was at a yard sale, in Michigan, checking out some desks, for his office. He stumbled across three, two of which were empty,m and the third, with a complete human skeleton, inside. He took them all to his studio.

In 2007, as the recession began to think its teeth into the economy, Mr. Robert had so much time on his hands that he decided to turn to the skeleton in his closet. Because its parts were wired together, for educational purposes, the artist decided he needed one that could be broken down into pieces. So he traded his skeleton, for a box filled with 206 real human bones.

Since then, Francois Robert has been spending most of his days, on his knees, arranging even the tiniest bones into the right position, for the perfect shot. His collection is called “Stop the Violence”, and it was inspired by the author’s fear of death. He says “”The bones are something left behind, a form of memory, I try to treat that person on my studio floor with respect.”

via DesignObserver

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Mosquito Monument Found in Russian Village

If this thing was for real, you’d need a lot more than a can of Raid, to hold on to your blood.

Back in 2007, Biologists from the Tyumen Regional Museum, who were examining the Noyabrsk area, for creating an eco-tourism route, for kids, stumbled across what they considered the most bizarre find, in their careers, in Lata village. A giant mosquito, as tall as an average person, was staring them in the face.

Luckily for them, this particular blood-sucker was just a sculpture, made from scrap metal. Local artist, Valery Chaliy built this strange monument, using old car and truck parts. It’s not exactly a monument, since we’re talking about a pest that no one would really miss, but the artist admits he was inspired by the millions of mosquitoes inhabiting the neighboring swamps.

Photos via svintuss

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Mike Libby’s Steampunk Insects

Stop! Don’t even think about screaming “Photoshopped!” because Mike Libby’s Insect Lab is 100% real. And so are his incredible Steampunk insects.

Mike began his unusual project on a day like any other, when he found an intact dead beetle. Thinking about how the little bug functioned as a mechanical device, he remembered he had also found an old wristwatch and decided to combine the two. After dissecting the beetle and mounting the mechanical parts, he realized he quite liked his new craft and decided to stick to it.

Now Mike Libby creates all kinds of Steampunk insects, from scorpions to ordinary beetles and dragonflies. He only works with non-endangered species from all around the world, fitting them with mechanisms from antique watches as well as old typewriter and sewing-machine parts.

Check out Mike Libby’s Insect Lab and feel free to email him if you want to purchase any of his Steampunk wonders or place a special order.

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Crucified Jesus Made of Toast

British artist Adam Sheldon recreated Jesus’ crucifixion using some pieces of burned toast and a scraping knife. His work of art is now on display at the Anglican Church of St Peter, in Lincs.

33-year-old Adam Sheldon took on the project at the request of his mother, who worships at St. Peter’s Church. Before starting work on his 1.8 ,meters long, 1.1 meters wide masterpiece, Adam scraped the Last Supper on three pieces of toast, to perfect his technique.

He used a regular toaster to burn the pieces of bread, then dried and flattened them so they would fit in a giant frame. Using a scraping knife he managed to create the lighter parts of the artwork, and darkened the background with a blowtorch.

At first, the reverend and parishioners were stunned by Sheldon’s creation, because they didn’t expect something this…original, but now they’re thrilled to have such art on the walls of their church. The artwork was so skillfully scraped, some believed it was actually painted on tiles, before realizing the tiles are really pieces of bread.

The toast crucifixion of Jesus will be on display at the Anglican Church of Saint Peter until January 30, if the rats don’t get to it by then.

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Knitted Dissection

Ah, these knitted artworks take me back to my high-school biology classes. Come to think of it, these memories are kind of gross…

The Crafty Hedgehog,  a skilled knitting artist, decided to immortalize one of the most exciting moments in the life of a high-school student, the dissection of a frog or rat. Entitled “Knitting in Biology 101”, his project depicts dissected animals, made out of wool and pinned to a dissecting tray of a cork frame. They’re not glued,so you can pick them up and examine the work on both sides.

You’ll be glad to know The Crafty Hedgehog has taken his knitting art even further and is now making “dissecting” fetal pigs and even…the Easter Bunny. If you like this sort of thing, you can order one via The Crafty Hedgehog’s profile on Etsy.

via worldfamousdesignjunkies

knitted-dissection

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Mark Evans Carves Art into Leather

Using only a couple of knives, a handful of scalpels and some special waxes, young Mark Evans turns pieces of leather into unique works of art.

All Mark Evans needs to create art out of cow hide is a knife, time and inspiration. Days, sometimes weeks, even months go by until his work is completed, but after all the etching and carving, a masterpiece is revealed. As if he he’s painting with a blade, mark is able to create mindblowing tonal pieces.

It all started when he was just seven years old, growing up in the Welsh Mountains. His grandfather gave him a knife and he began carving shapes in tree bark. Later he studied fine art, in London, and although he worked with more conventional materials, he could never get over his passion for playing with knives

Have a look at some of his most important leather paintings and also check out his official site.

Photos via Buzz Beast

Mark-Evans-art

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Microwaved Xbox 360 for Sale on eBay

Talk about a cool way to ruin a perfectly good Xbox 360 Elite and make a profit. Although I have to say the end result does look like a creature form a horror movie.

Kenny Irwin is a an American artist who microwaves stuff, using the AMIR 9000 microwaving robot, to create weird-looking art pieces. In the past he’s been known to nuke a fully functional Nintendo wii and now he’s done it again using Microsoft’s console.

Except for the creepy prosthetic eyes that the artist applied himself, it’s all 100% microwaved Xbox 360 Elite and it can be yours for the symbolic price of  $31,002! That’s right folks, $31 K for a broken gaming system, but at least you’ll be the proud owner of the world’s only microwaved Microsoft Xbox 360 Elite. Now this is what I call a bargain!

Microwaved-Xbox360

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Paul Hazelton Makes Art Out of Dust

I know I’ve said “you can turn anything into art”, but I never imagined someone could actually use household dust as material.

Paul Hazelton collects dust and manages to shape it into incredible works of art. The British artist says his affinity for dust might have something to do with his upbringing in a very clean environment. At one point n his life he noticed a layer of dust on a mask and realized he could pick it up. That was the beginning of an extraordinary dust-shaping career.

Paul works with ordinary household dust, which he gathers from furniture, hanging paintings, pictures, but never from vacuum cleaners. He stores the “precious” matter until he’s ready to mould it. Then he wets it, gives it the desired shape and carefully dries it.

It’s a painful process, but the 43-year-old dust artist loves it.

via Metro.co.uk

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Guns, Ammo, Art and Religion, by Al Farrow

They may look like just elaborate models of Christian, Jewish and Islamic holy places, but Al Farrow’s artworks have a much deeper meaning.

Al Farrow’s Religious Trifecta: A Synagogue, a Cathedral and a Mosque tries to reinterpret three of the world’s major religions according to their political, military and cultural history. As you surely know, religion played a major role in some of the greatest conflicts in history and that’s what the artist is trying to emphasize through his models. Built with used gun components, bullets and steel shots, these unusual holy places reveal the violent side of religion.

Al Farrow‘s steel masterpieces are displayed at the de Young Museum, in San Francisco.

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Hairdresser Makes Model of Tiananmen Square from Human Hair

Huang Xin, a hairdresser from Beijing has created replicas of monuments and famous buildings around Tiananmen Square, using discarded human hair.

I’ve seen some pretty impressive models throughout the years, including a plywood helicopter, a matchstick Minas Tirith or a toothpick city, but never anything made from human hair. But, they say there’s a first time for everything, so today I stumbled over some photos of famous Chinese buildings made entirely from human hair.

Huang Xin, a young Chinese hairdresser wanted to celebrate the 60th anniversary of People’s Republic of China in a unique manner and used his talent to do it. Using discarded human hair, mostly from women, he spent almost an entire year creating some very impressive models of Tiananmen Square.

photos via ImagineChina

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Real Sea-Faerie Mummy Sold on eBay

Discovered near one of Florida’s shorelines, this sea-faerie mummy is as real as these things get in the real world and it could have been yours.

This extremely rare creature has just been auctioned off on eBay and sold for $305. Had more people known about it, I’m sure the price would have went even higher. I mean, how many times do you get the opportunity to buy a sea faerie. Although it didn’t actually live in the sea, its parts did.

eBay member aquatica_art created the faerie by draping once organic fish skin around a short human skeleton. The wings are made from fish fins, and the lips, teeth and jaw-bone also come from fish. The long antennae were borrowed from the tail of a stingray. So you see, this IS a real sea-faerie!

And the best part about this unusual mummy is it has no fish odor at all.

sea-faerie

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The Roadkill Artist

Adam Morrigan, a British artist from Gloucestershire, Britain, creates works of art from roadkill and actually sells some of them

Adam is one of the most unusual artists on the planet. He makes a living creating and selling artworks made from the carcasses of dead animals he finds around his house. He often cooks and eats the roadkill he finds, but what he can’t eat, he turns into fashion accessories or pieces of dead art.

So far he has created over 30 roadkill art pieces, including bags made out of the body of a fox or a deer, calf-skin rugs, feather hats and even framed carcasses. It’s not something I’d buy for my art collection (if I had one), but apparently people are crazy about this roadkill art. Adam  Morrigan’s pieces start at a few thousand pounds, but he’s sold a few with as much as 50,000 pounds.

roadkill-art

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Toothpick City – Our World in Toothpicks

Stan Munro has spent the last six years of his life recreating some of the world’s most important landmarks out of nothing else but toothpicks.

Most people use them to get rid of food scraps from between their teeth, but 38-year-old Stan Munro, a former television host, uses them to create wooden works of art. Stan takes between one day and six months to glue together 1:164 scale models of some of the most impressive structures on Earth.

In order to create his amazing Toothpick City, Stan Munro has so far used six million toothpicks and 172 liters of glue, but his work is far from over. Right now he is working on a toothpick replica of Angkor Wat, the most complex structure he has ever had to build. All his models are on display at the Museum of Science and Technology, in Syracuse, New York.

Photos by SOLENT NEWS & PHOTO AGENCY

via Telegraph.co.uk

Here are some of his most incredible-looking toothpick creations:

toothpick-city

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