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Photography Profesor Has Camera Implanted in the Back of His Head

Photography professor Wafaa Bilal, at the New York University, has a let’s say original vision on what we generally refer to as art.

He intents to put together an exhibit of art called “The 3rd I” which will be featured at the  Arab Museum of Modern Art in Mathaf. And for that particular reason he implanted a camera in the back of his head. Well,not literally,but he had a titanium plate implanted at a piercing shop. This allows him to attach a camera using magnets, camera which will take a photo every minute. The only time Bilal won’t be able to use it will be on campus at NYU, thus protecting the privacy of his students.

The opening of The Arab Museum of Modern Art will take place on Dec. 30, occasion with which they are hosting the “Told/Untold/Retold” exhibition, gathering the works of 23 key modern artist, including Wafaa Bilal.

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The Cool Conceptual Art of Horacio Salinas

Horacio Salinas is an acclaimed conceptual still life photographer who manages to turn the most common objects of every day life into works of art.

The New Yoirk based photographer of Argentinian decent has worked with some of the most important publications in the world, including Vogue, GQ and the New York Times. Asked how he would describe his original work, Horacio Salinas said: “”If I have to do one picture about a topic, I want that picture to say everything in a second.” All I know is his creations put a smile on my face, and that’s good enough for me

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Pilobolus Dance Theatre Becomes Human Alphabet

By twisting their bodies into impossible positions, the members of the Pilobolus Dance Theater have recreated 26 letters of the alphabet.

To immortalize their efforts, the Pilobolus recruited photographer John Kane, who used secrets of the trade to make the human letters look amazing. The magic happened in John’s studio, in Connecticut, over a period of four days. According to the six highly trained contortionists that took part in the project, the hardest letters were “C” and “R”. Although they wouldn’t reveal the secret behind how they pulled it off, John and the dancers swear no Photoshop was used. The same thing can’t be said abut the Yoga Dogs calendar.

The human alphabet photos, taken by John Kane, were used in a book aimed at children and adults alike. Called “Pilobolus – The Human Alphabet” this collection of human letters aims to show off the theater’s talent and inspire young dancers.

Photos by JOHN KANE/BARCROFT MEDIA via Daily Mail

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Kerry Skarbakka and the Art of Falling

The Falling Photographer, as he is commonly known, shoots photo of himself right in the middle of a big fall, in the name of art.

Kerry Skarbakka says he first began taking falling pictures right after the events of 9/11 and uses his body ” as a metaphor to describe the tensions and anxieties we all feel.” For some of his works, the artist uses special rigging and climbing equipment to achieve the desired effect, but he often  plunges dangerously, with no protection.

The Falling Photographer travels all over the world in search for suitable locations to shoot his photos and he also sets up scenes in his personal studio. For the bathtub photo below, he installed an installation to make him flip in the air, but he still banged his head on the side of the tub a few times.

Kerry’s works have been exhibited in art galleries across the world and he plans to shoot enough photos to put together a book. So far he has around 40 photos that can be purchased for as much as 4,500 pounds.

Photos by KERRY SKARBAKKA/BARCROFT MEDIA

via Telegraph.co.uk

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Living Photos by Mole and Thomas

Taken at the beginning of the 20th century, by English photographer Arthur S. Mole and his American colleague John D. Thomas, these living photographs show thousands of American soldiers posing as symbols of American history.

I’ve seen a few of these living photos on the internet before, but it’s nice to finally find some real info about them, like what they represent and how many people were needed to create them.

via Telegraph.co.uk

The Living Uncle Sam: 19,000 officers and men at Camp Lee, Virginia, January 13, 1919

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The Human US Shield: 30,000 officers and men at Camp Custer, Battle Creek, Michigan, 1918

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The living emblem of the United States Marines, formed by 100 officers and 9,000 enlisted men at the Marine Barracks, Paris Island, South Carolina

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A portrait of President Woodrow Wilson, formed of 21,000 officers and men at Camp Sherman, Chillicothe, Ohio, 1918
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The Human Liberty Bell, formed by 25,000 officers and men at Camp Dix, New Jersey, 1918

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The Human American Eagle: 12,500 officers, nurses and men at Camp Gordon, Atlanta, Georgia, 1918

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Living insignia of the 27th Division, New York’s Own, breakers of the Hindenberg Line. Formed of 10,000 officers and enlisted men, March 18, 1919

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In the picture of the Statue of Liberty there are 18,000 men: 12,000 of them in the torch alone, but just 17 at the base. The men at the top of the picture are actually half a mile away from the men at the bottom

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Fish-Head Art Smells Fishy

After the photos I’ve seen so far, I can truly say there’s art in everything, even fish heads.

Anne-Catherine Becker-Echivard loves is a very original Berlin-based artist who uses fish heads to create regular works of art. It might be bizarre or funny, but it certainly isn’t easy. The artists uses negative-film cameras and photographs to create the photos you see below, and each of them can take up to three months to complete.

via CCTV.com

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Star-Wars Chipmunks

What do chipmunks and Star-Wars have in common? I have no idea, but Canadian illustrator Chris McVeigh though it would be funny to mix them together.

Using a lot of patience and a significant amount of almonds, McVeigh managed to convince these cute, furry rodents to pose with action-figures from the popular sci-fi series Star-Wars. It all started when he befriended a chipmunk trapped in his father’s garden shed. He got quite close to it after a while and realized he could get them to do practically anything.

Great photos by Chris McVeigh and amazing acting by the chipmunks.

Photos by Chris McVeigh/BARCROFT MEDIA

via Telegraph.co.uk

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