Artist Makes Detailed Architectural Models from Paper

US-based artist Christina Lihan uses her experience as an architect to create detailed models of famous buildings and urban spaces, from paper.

Ms. Lihan received a Bachelor’s degree in architecture from the University of Virginia and went on to get her Master’s in architecture, from Columbia University, in New York. She done internships in England, France and Italy, but it was the repetitive,┬ámonotonous rhythm of hundreds of soviet-built housing cities she saw in Czechoslovakia that most influenced the way she looked at building facades. After completing her studies, she decided to use all of the acquired knowledge in the name of art, by creating impressive architectural models from paper.

Christina Lihan first decided to dedicate her life to art during the time she spent living in Florida, designing hospitals for another architect. She was really bored, and realized she needed a creative outlet so she just started cutting paper, playing with it and trying to turn it into building models. It sort of grew from there and ultimately became her passion. Her impressive creations are made from unpainted, 300lb, watercolor paper. She carves, cuts and folds every little piece by hand until she assembles them into a completed composition. Ms. Lihan starts by photographing the site she wants to replicate, then moves on to sketching with charcoal, and finally enlarges the drawing to the desired size of the finished piece. She generally places the detailed pieces of paper directly over the drawing.

As you can imagine, creating such intricate models from paper can be quite time consuming. According to Christina Lihan, a small 18-by-24 piece can take up to 50 hours to complete.

 

 

 

 

via Designboom, Design Collector


   

Feedback (3 Comments)

  • forrest Posted on August 11, 2011

    creating these amazing masterpiece need much focus, spirit, thought and energy. I am much astonished but appreciated her passion on it. It is an good example for us that pursuing personal satisfaction could push someone to be ultimately successful.

  • mina Posted on November 19, 2011

    very nice………woooooooooooow