Political Candidate Forced to Run Against Doppelgangers Who Also Stole His Name

An opposition party candidate running for a municipal position in St Petersburg, Russia, is competing against at least two other people who not only legally changed their names to his, but also borrowed his physical appearance to confuse voters.

Russian opposition politicians are used to running against candidates with the same surname, it’s a commonly used tactic that can derail a few precious votes in close elections, but Boris Vishnevsky’s case stands out. A senior member of the liberal Yabloko party running for public office in a district of Saint Petersburg, Vishnevsky already knew that two of his opponents had recently changed their names to “Boris Vishnevsky” to confuse voters. What he didn’t know was that they’d stolen his look as well. In a district voting poster showing the three candidates side by side, it’s difficult to tell them apart, because they all look nearly identical.

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Political Candidates in India Are Using Stray Dogs as Walking Billboards

Elections in India’s Uttar Pradesh state are literally going to the dogs as several candidates are reportedly using stray dogs as billboards to make sure their campaign messages reach as many people as possible.

At least two candidates – one in Rae Bareli and another in Ballia district – have been attaching their campaign banners and posters to stray dogs in their areas and letting them roam around. Photos of these walking, barking advertising billboards went viral on social media this past weekend, angering animal protection activists, and inspiring all sorts of memes. But despite the negative feedback to the advertising tactic, one of the candidates who admitted to using dogs to get his message out there has no regrets.

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Man Cuts Off His Own Finger After Accidentally Voting for Wrong Candidate in National Election

Pawan Kumar, a 25-year-old Indian man from Uttar Pradesh, chopped off his index finger with a meat cleaver in desperation, after accidentally voting fro the wrong candidate in India’s national election.

Kumar became an overnight sensation, first in India, and then globally, thanks to a viral video of him with a bandaged index finger after he reportedly cut part of it off as self-punishment for voting for the wrong candidate. The young Dalit told reporters that he wanted to cast his vote in favor of SP-BSP-RLD candidate Yogesh Sharma, but got confused by the party symbols, and ended up voting for the ruling Bahujan Samaj Party (BSP) instead. He couldn’t live with his mistake and decided to chop off his finger in desperation.

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Elementary School Has Correctly Predicted Every U.S. Presidential Election Since 1968

Students at Benjamin Franklin Elementary School, in Yorktown Heights, New York, have been casting their votes to determine the winner of each presidential election, since 1968, and for the past 48 years, they’ve gotten it right every time.

Every four years,  just days before the actual presidential election, the elementary school sets up mock voting booths and invites its students – from kindergarten to fifth grade – to cast their ballot for the candidate that they think would deserve to become president of the United States of America. But it’s the process leading up to the vote that’s genuinely interesting. The students spend months learning about the candidates, who they only know as ‘Candidate A’ and ‘Candidate B’, focusing on policy and real issues, instead of on their personality and popularity. “We talk about exact facts and issues and put them on two sides of a spreadsheet. Then the students debate the facts in class,” principal Patricia Moore says.

Eventually, the kids are told which candidate they had been siding with, and with this last piece of information in mind, they are ready to cast their vote. The same scenario been unfolding every four years since 1968, since Tom McAdams, a fifth-grade social studies teacher initiated the tradition, and the kids have predicted the result of the election every time.

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