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Man Lives in Air-Tight Tent with 200 Plants to See If They Could Generate Enough Oxygen for Him

A self-described “whimsical scientist” locked himself in a small air-tight plastic foil tent with 200 plants to see if they could covert CO2 into oxygen fast enough to keep him alive.

Kurtis Baute sealed himself in a 3m by 3m plastic-wrapped biodome in his brother’s backyard in British Columbia, Canada, last week, but he announced his audacious plan to his YouTube fans, in August. He hoped to find out if by surrounding himself with plants, enough of the CO2 he breathed out could be converted into oxygen to allow him to survive in the sealed enclosure for at least three days. Unfortunately, he had to abort the experiment after only 15 hours, as CO2 levels reached a dangerous point where he risked suffering brain damage or even falling into a coma.

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Meet Norman, the World’s First Psychopath AI

Scientists at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology have trained an artificial intelligence algorithm  to become a psychopath by exposing it to gruesome and violent images on popular social network Reddit.

Called Norman, after the iconic Anthony Perkins character in Alfred Hitchcock’s 1960 classic “Psycho”, the AI was trained to perform image captioning, a popular deep learning method of generating a textual description of an image. But there was a fun twist – for an extended period of time, Norman was only exposed to gruesome and violent images from an infamous subreddit dedicated to documenting and observing the disturbing reality of death. Researchers then used Rorsach inkblots to compare Norman to other AI which hadn’t been exposed to the same gruesome images.

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The Sinister True Story of the Triplets Separated at Birth as Part of Cruel Social Experiment

In 1980, when Robert Shafran arrived for his first day of college at Sullivan County Community College in New York, he was confused and overwhelmed by people he had never met warmly greeting him with hugs and high-fives, and, strangest of all, calling him Eddy. The reason behind the odd reception emerged when he met his new roommate Michael Domitz.

It turned out that Michael’s roommate from the previous year was Eddy Galland, a young man who not only looked exactly like Robert, but walked, talked, and acted like him as well. The two men were exact copies of each other, so after Michael learned that Robert was born on the same day as his old roommate and that, like him, he was adopted, he decided the two of them had to meet.

“He had the same grin, the same hair, the same expressions — it was his double,” Domitz says in Tom Wardle’s new documentary “Three Identical Strangers”, which won a special jury award at the Sundance Film Festival earlier this year.

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Chinese Scientist Passes 71,000 Volts of Static Electricity Through His Body to Test Human Limit

For years, experts have suggested that 50,000 volts of static electricity is the highest threshold that the human body can withstand, but one Chinese scientist recently proved them wrong by passing 71,000 volts through his body and living to tell the tale.

Liu Shangshe, an academic at the Chinese Academy of Engineering, in Beijing, recently took a very hands-on approach to testing the human threshold for static electricity. In a controversial experiment to determine how much static electricity the human body can withstand, the Chinese researcher passed 71,000 volts of static electricity through his own body. According to Chinese media, Shangshe’s assistants started at 20,000 volts, ramping up the voltage in stages, causing all the hair on his body to stand on end with every discharge.

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Latvian Man Drives Rusty Car into Pool Filled with 12,000 Liters of Coke

An elderly man in Latvia recently got his 15 minutes of fame after a video of him driving an old Audi into a makeshift pool filled with 6,000 two liter bottles-worth of Coke to see if it would help get rid of the rust, went viral this week.

The eccentric 73-year-old Latvian, whose name has not yet been revealed, claims that he spent around $8,700 setting up the bizarre yet hilarious experiment. He started out by digging a large hole on his farm, near Sheder, south-east Latvia, lining it with thick plastic foil, and then proceeded to empty a whopping 6,000 two-liter bottles of Coke into it. For his first trick, he poured 88 pounds of baking soda into the fizzy pool, attempting to create a spectacular chemical reaction, but seeing that nothing too impressive happened, he got into his old Audi 80 and decided to drive it into the pool to see if the Coke would clean up all the rust.

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Boston Man Commits to Never Telling a Lie Again, Ever

Can you imagine never telling another lie – not even an innocent one – for the rest of your life? How about for a whole day? Yeah, me neither, which is why Keith Frankel’s commitment to a no-lie lifestyle is so intriguing.

Up until six months ago, Keith Frankel, a product design executive at Boston education software startup Firecracker, was no different than the rest of us – he would lie on a daily basis, and he was fully aware of it. He admits he had been aware of his ability to lie both persuasively and effectively and that his skills only got better with age. “Sometimes, my career necessitated that I play my little trump card in order to succeed at ‘the game’. Other times, my personal life could be made just a bit more convenient with a little fib here or there. To no surprise, the more I lied, the better I became at lying in the future. Lying, like any other skill, only gets stronger the more you use it,” Frankel says.

He didn’t really see the harm in lying, at first, especially since his little white lies didn’t really have disastrous consequences on the lives of those around him, they were just “little deceptions, teeny, tiny misdirections.” But at one point, Keith realized that having his friends and family seeing him constantly lie to other people had planted seeds of distrust in them – they knew that he could very well lie to them if he so wished (and he admits he did). He felt these ‘tiny erosions of trust’, as he calls them, not only weakened his relationship with his loved ones, but also called into question everything he claimed to be and will eventually become. Worse still, once plated, these seeds of doubt slowly whether relationships and are almost impossible to address effectively.

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Smell Dating Service Matches People Based on Solely on Their Odor

Smell undoubtedly contributes to a person’s attractiveness, but could it be the sole deciding factor in choosing a partner? Well, the creators of this New York matchmaking service decided to find out. At ‘Smell Dating’, the world’s “first mail odor dating service”, single people are paired up based on their reaction to each other’s body odor.

Created by Tega Brain, artist and teacher at New York’s School for Poetic Computation, and Sam Lavigne, an editor and researcher at New York University, Smell Dating is described more as an art project than a business. They based the project on the science behind pheromones, which are chemical signals that different species send out to attract mates. “Unlike sight and sound, smell is interpreted first in terms of memory and emotion before being mapped to language,” the project website reads. “When it comes to long-term romantic partnership, it may actually be riskier to ignore the powerful signal of scent than to rely on it.”

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Russian Scientist Injects Himself with 3.5 Million Year Old “Eternal Life” Bacteria

A group of Russian scientists believe that the secret to eternal youth might actually lies in the permafrost of Siberia. They’re experimenting with a strain of bacteria that has managed to survive for millions of years in the permafrost. One enterprising scientist has even injected himself with the ancient bacteria discovered in 2009, in Sakha Republic, Siberia.

Anatoli Brouchkov, head of the Geocryology Department at Moscow State University, is the man behind the remarkable discovery. Two years ago, he volunteered to become a guinea pig for the 3.5 million year old bacteria after several successful trials on mice and human blood cells. And he claims to have become healthier and more energetic ever since.

“I started to work longer, I’ve never had a flu for the last two years,” he told The Siberian Times.

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