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German City Will Pay You One Million Euros if You Can Prove That It Doesn’t Exist.

The German city of Bielefeld, in the north-east of North Rhine-Westphalia, has announced that it is offering a €1 million prize to anyone who can prove that it doesn’t exist.

To have any hope of understanding this bizarre offer, you have to go back to 1993 when the famous “Bielefeld? There’s No Such Thing!” conspiracy theory appeared on the internet. Formulated by a computer student named Achim Held, it basically claimed that Bielefeld – a city of around 330,000 inhabitants, which has historically been around for around 800 years – didn’t actually exist, because, unlike other German cities, it wasn’t really known for anything in particular. The hilarious conspiracy theory spread online and gained a life of its own, with many proponents postulated that a group called “SIE,” or “THEY” in German, created an imaginary illusion of the city, or that it had a secret city center where “dead” celebrities like Elvis Presley and Kurt Cobain had been taken away to.

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Mysterious Benefactor in Germany Has Donated Over $220,000 in Cash to Charity

Since the beginning of the year, a mystery donor in the German city of Braunschweig has given away several ‘miracle bags’ containing over 200,000 euros in cash to various charities.

The bags, each stuffed with banknotes worth between 20,000 and 100,000 euros, started appearing at the Braunschweiger Zeitung newspaper headquarters earlier this year, with specific instructions of which local charities the money should go to. The latest one, a bag containing 100,000 euros in two hundred €500 euro bills, was received last Monday along with instructions that it be donated to a local hospice, but other miracle bags have gone to churches, organizations helping crime victims, and several other causes.

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German Woman Tries to Buy Car with Fake Money Printed on Inkjet Printer

A 20-year-old woman was recently arrested in Germany for walking into a car dealership and trying to by a €15,000 car with fake banknotes printed on a cheap inkjet printer using regular printing paper.

The unnamed woman reportedly walked into the car dealership in the German city of Kaiserslautern on Monday wanting to buy a used 2013 Audi A3. At first, everything went smoothly. She inspected the car, took it for a test drive, but when the time came to pay the €15,000 price, dealership staff were stunned to receive a waddle of €50 and €100 bills that looked more like Monopoly money than actual currency. One employee told German media that he literally asked the woman if she wanted to play Monopoly or buy a car, but after seeing that she was serious, he called the police.

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Parents Forget Newborn Baby in Taxi on Their Way Back from the Hospital

Hamburg police recently took to Facebook to report the hilarious case of two young parents who forgot their newborn baby in the back of a taxi on their way back from the hospital where it had been delivered.

According to the viral social media post, the forgetful parents had just given birth to their second child at a Hamburg hospital and were excited to get back home as a family of four. So excited in fact, that when it was time to get out of the taxi and introduce their bundle of joy to his crib, they actually forgot to take the said bundle of joy with them. They took the baby’s one-year-old sibling out of the car, paid the cab driver and said their goodbye. But as the tax was pulling away, the couple got a strange feeling that something was missing, only by the time they realized they were missing their newest family member, it was too late.

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Fuggerei – The German Housing Complex Where Rent Hasn’t Gone Up in 500 Years

In a time when the cost of renting a home seems to be getting higher virtually everywhere in the civilized world, the residents of an idyllic housing complex in Germany are living in an inflation-free utopia. The people of Fuggerei, a walled district on the outskirts of Augsburg, pay only $1 a year on rent, the same as the first tenants who originally moved here nearly 500 years ago.

Fuggerei was founded in 1514 by an affluent businessman named Jakob Fugger, as a social housing complex for the poorest people of Augsburg. The Fugger family moved to the bustling German city in the mid-14th century and established a prosperous cloth trading business. By the 16th century, the Fugger family was one of the richest in Augsburg, and their operations expanded to real-estate and banking. Jakob Fugger was the wealthiest banker in the city, which earned him the nickname “Jakob Fugger the Rich”, but he stayed true to his family’s values, and in 1514 he started the construction of Fuggerei as a way of giving back to the community.

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German Town Seizes Family’s Dog Over Unpaid Taxes, Sells It on eBay

Authorities in the German town of Ahlen have come under fire for seizing a family’s dog over unpaid taxes and then selling it on eBay to recover the money owed.

This bizarre story started back in November, 2018, when a court bailiff and two city officials showed up at an Ahlen family’s home to seize valuables as compensation for financial debts owed to the municipality. The family, who preferred to remain anonymous, told local newspaper Ahlener Tageblatt that the officials first tried to seize her disabled husband’s wheelchair, but couldn’t because it wasn’t their property. Instead, they settled on the family’s pet dog, a pedigree pug named Edda.

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Pastor Uses Whisky to Get Men Closer to God

A German pastor thinks he may have found a an effective way to approach the men in his community and it involves one of his greatest passions, whisky.

53-year-old Thomas Eschenbacher, a Franconian pastor from Hammelburg, in Bavaria, has long been looking for ways to approach men and talk to them about God and the Christian faith. It’s not the easiest thing to do, especially in this day in age, but Eschenbacher thinks whisky may just be the solution to his problem. A big fan of the Scottish spirit, the pastor noticed how easy it was to start a conversation about whisky during a leisurely whiskey tasting evening with friends, and decided to use the same catalyst to get through to men in matters of religion. He  recently announced that he was organizing a “whisky retreat” for men and all the 30 available spots were sold out almost instantly.

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Man Gets Banned by All-You-Can-Eat Restaurant for Eating Too Much

Jaroslav Bobrowski, a young Ironman triathlete from Germany, was recently banned by an-all-you-can-eat sushi restaurant for eating around 100 plates of food, something the owner considered “not normal” and very bad for business.

30-year-old Bobrowski works as a software engineer, but also trains for Ironman triathlons and is on a special diet where he doesn’t eat anything for 20 hours a day and then eats until he is full. Last weekend, he and his girlfriend stopped at the Running Sushi all-you-can-eat restaurant in Landshut, Bavaria, where he paid the fixed price of €15.90 and spent about an hour and a half stuffing himself with around 100 plates of sushi. At one point, waiters just stopped clearing his table of plates and when he finally finished, the former bodybuilder was told that he wasn’t welcome anymore.

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These German Scientists Will Pay You 10,000 Euros if You Can Prove That You Have Superpowers

Think you can move small objects using only the power of your brain? Can you find water using a simple divining rod, or maybe just transmit thoughts telepathically? If you can prove your superpowers, a group of scientists in Germany would love to reward you with €10,000 ($11,700).

The Society for the Scientific Investigation of Para-Sciences (GWUP) is a group of German physicists, biologists and psychologists who believe that people who claim to have super-powers like telekinesis, telepathy or divining abilities should not be dismissed as mere charlatans, but actually studied and allowed to prove their abilities in controlled laboratory conditions. Every year, they invite candidates to the University of Würzburg, in Würzburg, Germany, to show off their super-powers and potentially win a cool €10,000 prize. Over 60 people have been tested in recent years, but none of them have been able to claim the coveted prize.

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Restaurant Owner Restricts Entry to Children Under 14 Years of Age

The owner of a restaurant in Binz, Germany, has come under fire for banning children aged 14 and younger from entering his establishment after 5 pm.

Rudolf Markl, the owner of “Oma’s Küche” (Grandma’s Kitchen), a traditional restaurant in Binz, on the German island of  Rügen got so fed up with children’s tantrums and unruly behavior that he recently made the extreme decision to ban them from his restaurant after 5 pm. He even put up a sign near the entrance letting patrons know that in the evening, Oma’s Küche is an adult-only restaurant. Despite being accused of discrimination, Markl said that this measure was a long time coming and that he plans to enforce it going forward.

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This Tree in Germany Has Been Helping People Find Love for Over a Century

The Bridegroom’s Oak, a 500-year-old tree just outside of Eutin, in Germany, has its own postal address and actually receives around 40 letters every day. They are sent by love seekers from all around the world, in the hope that someone will read them and write back.

With so many dating apps and services available nowadays, sending letters to a tree in Germany hardly sounds like the most effective way to find love, but for true romantics, there’s really no comparison. There’s just something undeniably charming about sending a letter and allowing fate to work its magic, so the Bridegroom’s Oak remains very popular even in this digital age.

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German Lawyer Can’t Get Any Work Done Because Someone Keeps Ordering Pizza on His Behalf

Guido Grolle, a lawyer from Dortmund, Germany, was recently forced to file complaint with the local police, because someone keeps sending him pizzas to his workplace. Over the past two and a half weeks, the man has received over 100 pizzas he never ordered, and he just wants the madness to stop.

By the time he gets out of the shower in the morning, Grolle sometimes receives several emails letting him know that the pizzas he ordered will be delivered to his office at lunch. On some days, you can actually see several pizza delivery guys crossing the street to bring the lawyer the lunch he never asked for. This has been going on since late January, and Grolle really has had enough of it.

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Leading Member of German Far-Right Political Party Quits After Converting to Islam

Arthur Wagner, a leading member of Alternative für Deutschland (AfD), a far-right German political party whose slogan is “Islam doesn’t belong in Germany”, recently resigned after converting to Islam.

Originally created as an anti-euro party, the AfD has recently campaigned on an anti-Muslim, anti immigration platform, strongly criticizing Chancellor Angela Merkel’s decision to allow over a million refugees into Germany, since 2015. Just last summer, Arthur Wagner, who sat on the party’s executive committee in the state of Brandenburg, accused Merkel of “making a big mistake” by allowing so many Muslim refugees into the country, and warned that “Germany is mutating into a different country”. On January 11th, he left the party citing personal reasons, but it was later revealed that he had converted to Islam.

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Hobby Historian Claims to Have Discovered Forgotten 80-Meter Section of the Berlin Wall

Save for a few symbolic sections in the center of the German capital, the Berlin wall was completely demolished in 1989 . However, a local hobby historian claims to have discovered an 80-meter-long section of which authorities apparently knew nothing about.

37-year-old Christian Bormann found the forgotten section of the Berlin Wall between two train stations in the Pankow district in the northeast of the city, back in 1999. The local government office responsible for monuments was unaware of the surviving segment, and records showed the section registered as demolished. Bormann kept his discovery to himself until recently, when he noticed that it had been damage by storms. Concerned about the slowly deteriorating monument, he finally revealed his secret in a blog post and contacted Pankow district authorities, calling on them to protect it as a historical monument.

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German Schools Use Sand-Filled Vests to Calm Down Hyperactive Children

200 schools in Germany have begun asking hyperactive children, typically those with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), to wear heavy sand-filled vests to calm them down and keep them in their seats during classes. The controversial vests, which weigh between 1.2 and six kilograms (2.7 – 13Ib), have sparked misgivings among parents and psychiatrists.

There are plenty of advocates, however, who claim to have witnessed remarkable changes in behavior among the children who have worn them and insisted that they help curb restlessness. There has been a growing number of ADHD cases diagnosed in Germany each year, and schools that use the vest claim that they are a gentler and less complicated way to tackle the phenomenon than administering psychiatric drugs such as Ritalin.

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