Ghosts of a Dream – Recycled Lottery Ticket Art

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Lottery tickets don’t mean much after you’ve scratched away the glittering layer only to see your hopes go up in smoke, but that doesn’t mean the little paper slips can’t serve a brand new purpose.

Ghosts of a Dream is an artistic duo made of Adam Ecksrom and Lauren Was, two talented graduates of the Rhode Island School of Design. They take the used lottery tickets and recreate what people usually dream of winning when they buy them. You could say the tickets go from dreams to complete garbage and finally turn into something (sort of) real.

Everything Ghosts of Dreams creates is made of various salvaged objects and thousands of discarded lottery tickets.  Among their most impressive projets are the Dream Home, a make-belief home made from $70,000 worth of lottery tickets, the Dream Car, a Hummer mockup made with $39,000 worth of lottery tickets, or the Dream Vacation created with $29,000 worth of tickets.

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The Sugar-Cube Structures of Lionel Scoccimaro

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French rtist Lionel Scoccimaro creates unique art installations by working with unusual mediums, such as sugar cubes. A big fan of Evil Knievel, skateboarding and surfing, Scoccimaro employs a great deal of fun into his art, but he says “I’m very serious about the way I ‘have fun,’ because it’s my only way of renewing myself and finding pleasure in my studio.”

Throughout the years, Scoccimaro has  created a variety of artworks, but his sugar-cube structures are definitely the most impressive. His Snow Landscape installation was 40 square meters in size, while White Lanscape was done using 400 kilograms of sugar.

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The Soon to Be World’s Longest Bench of Littlehampton

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With a capacity to seat up to 300 people, the bench of Littlehampton Beach is already the longest bench in Britain, but is preparing to snatch the title of longest bench in the world.

Designed by the guys at Studio Weave, the 324-meter-long bench of Littlehampton is definitely a sight to behold. It was made from tropical hardwood, salvaged from landfills and old seaside groynes, thus making it a monument to modern recycling.

Built along the promenade, the unique bench twists and turns, bends around trash bins, meanders around lampposts, and even goes into the ground to allow easy passage between Littlehampton’s Blue Flag Beach and the green that surrounds it.

The project may have been executed by the designers of Studio Weave, but it was initiated by locals and entrepreneurs of Littlehampton, who wanted something special for ther beloved venue. Students from a local school provided valuable insight about what makes Littlehampton Beach unique, and offered ideas about the color pallet used on the bench.

With its one-of-a-kind design and color scheme, the Littlehampton bench is already a famous British landmark, but the residents of the seaside resort have their sight set on a place in the record books. They are preparing to extend Littlehampton bench to 621 meters, and make it the longest bench in the world.

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The Intricate Paperworks of Simon Schubert

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By carefully folding simple pieces of paper, German artist Simon Schubert creates amazing 2D masterpieces.

Cologne-based Simon Schubert creates two-dimensional architectural sceneries by simply folding paper sheets, and without any pen or pencil. His artworks are definitely colored enough without drawing instruments. While subtle, his folded paper artworks invite you to appreciate the level of craftsmanship that went into making them.

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The Banana Boats of Jacob Dahlstrup

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Danish artist Jacob Dahlstrup loves to build miniature boats, but instead of using wood, he builds their hulls out of ripe bananas. His works were recently on display at the Shoreditch Town Hall, in London, and you can see his entire portfolio on his official site. While I’m pretty sure they don’t float (not the way a boat is supposed to, anyway), Jacob Dahlstrup’s banana boats make great, nutritious snacks.

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Creative Poster Urban Art Spotted in Berlin

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This may not be the weirdest thing you see today but I’m sure it’s one of the most inspiring ways of dealing with junk like excess posters.

I hate it when too many posters gather on top of each other, and no one cares to clean them up. I’m thinking I may not be the only one, since someone took matters into their own hands and decided to deal with this poster problem themselves. Instead of pealing away the paper blocks, they decided to carve them into beautiful works of urban art. The artist is unknown, but this is one of the coolest things I’ve ever seen. Ypu can find this masterpiece somewhere in Berlin.

 

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The Wooden Clothes of Fraser Smith

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Get ready for a “can you believe the’re made of wood?!?” moment folks, because the sculpted clothes of Fraser Smith are unlike anything you’ve ever seen.

Fraser Smith is a very talented wood sculptor who creates tromp l’oeil works using various soft wood essences. He specializes in carving the kind of things no one would ever believe could be created from wooden blocks, and manages to fool the human eye every time. At every one of his exhibitions, you’ll always here things like “Wow, there’s no way these are made of wood!” Yes, his wooden sculptures are so good most people can’t believe their eyes.

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The Rat Poison Packaging Art of Jason Clay Lewis

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Who knew rat poison could be used for anything other than killing rats, right? Well, American artist Jason Clay Lewis has been using the famous d-CON rat poison and its yellow packaging to create unique works of art.

Jason Clay Lewis has always been fascinated by bizarre materials that help him develop his idea of attraction versus repultion, and d-CON packages are some of his greatest finds. Back in 2008, the New-York-based artist created d-CON Mary, a unique reproduction of the Virgin Mary statue made of fibreglas and d-CON packaging. It managed to draw attention to Jason’s work, and since then he has created an entire series of sculptures made from d-CON packs, and even the rat poison itself.

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Samurai Star Wars

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Did you ever wonder what Star Wars would have looked like if it had been directed by Japanese director Akira Kurosawa, instead of George Lucas? Well, someone did, and here’s what they came up with.

Sillof, a high-school history and film teacher with no formal art training, imagined the Star Wars characters through the eyes of legendary Japanese director Akira Kurosawa. He remembered George Lucas saying he was a fan of Kurosawa, and that he used his “the Hidden Fortress” as inspiration for Star Wars and decided to create a series of samurai style Star Wars action figures.

The Samurai Star wars cast definitely hints at the original characters, but they stay true to the Japanese style as well. Truly unique works of art, Sillof’s action figures can be admired in all their glory, at his online workshop.

 

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The Cool Conceptual Art of Horacio Salinas

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Horacio Salinas is an acclaimed conceptual still life photographer who manages to turn the most common objects of every day life into works of art.

The New Yoirk based photographer of Argentinian decent has worked with some of the most important publications in the world, including Vogue, GQ and the New York Times. Asked how he would describe his original work, Horacio Salinas said: “”If I have to do one picture about a topic, I want that picture to say everything in a second.” All I know is his creations put a smile on my face, and that’s good enough for me

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The Contaminated Ceramics of Tamsin van Essen

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They may look like ceramic cups that haven’t been washed in years, but these are genuine artworks made by British designer Tamsin van Essen.

Using various “foreign” materials, the artist managed to mimic the infestation of various bacterias on ceramic bowls. As real as the contamination with Salmonella and Streptococcus may seem, the bowls are perfectly clean and ready to be used. Even knowing that, I doubt anyone would be crazy enough to actually use them.

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Mona Lisa Mosaic Made of Burnt Toast

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For the last 10 years, Maurice “Toastman” Bennet has been making incredible masterpieces from pieces of toast. His last work of art is a giant crunchy replica of Mona Lisa.

Last week, the Toastman spent most of his time at the K-11 shopping mall, in Hong Kong, working on his newest work for the upcoming Food Art Festival. His entire studio smelled of gas and burnt toast, but the final result was fully worth it. He managed to create a beautiful replica of Mona Lisa eating a pink ice cream, out of around 6,000 individual pieces of toast. And he did it all by using a blow torch to create patterns and different color tones.

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The Pencil Tip Masterpices of Dalton Ghetti

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Many artists use pencils to create their works of art, but in the case of  Dalton Ghetti, his pencils actually become artworks.

49-year-old Dalton Ghetti loved to carve things as long as he can remember. As a child, he used to carve his friends’ names into the sides of pencils and offer them as presents. Later, he took sculpting more seriously and began making large wooden sculptures, until he decided to challenge himself and make really tiny artworks. He experimented with many mediums, such as chalk, until the day he discovered pencil graphite.

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Kay Petal’s Needle Felted Celebrities

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Without using any patterns or sewing stitches, Kay Petal manipulates a difficult art medium like wool into amazing needle felted dolls.

Kay Petal discovered needle felting back in 2007, while she was recovering from a rare form of cancer. She had realized life was too short and that she needed to focus less on the mundane things in life, and more on finding the thing she is most passionate about. As soon as she found needle felting online, something happened and she just started researching on it. She had discovered a unique way of bringing wool to life, and she never looked back since.

Kay can create any kind of needle felted dolls, but lately, she has been focusing on making doll caricatures of real life celebrities. Her artistic efforts have been rewarded by various design and craft sites which published some of her works and introduced her amazing talent to the world.

Check out more of Kay’s work on her official site, Flickr and Youtube

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Vintage Vampire Killing Kits at Ripley’s Museums

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Vampire killing kits were a must-have for wealthy nobles traveling to Eastern Europe, during the mid 19th century, and with vampires making a comeback (at least in Hollywood), these things may still be useful.

There are only a few original vampire kits in the world, and most of them, 26 to be exact, can be found in Ripley’s Believe It or Not museums, in 8 countries around the world. With interest for vampires on the rise, in the media, vampire killing kits are among the most popular of Ripley’s  exhibits.

Most vampire killing kits were made in Boston, and contained a crucifix, bible, wooden stake, holy water, pistol with lead bullets and various concoctions meant to wreak havoc among blood suckers. They were available by mail order, for people traveling to remote regions like Transylvania, where people were talking about vampires well before Bram Stoker invented Dracula.

These are only 8 of the vampire kits in Ripley’s possession, but you can get an idea of how cool they are. I wonder if they’re interested in this 19th century vampire slaying kit we featured a while back. It would be a nice addition to their collection.

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