African Country Turns Off Mobile Internet to Discourage Cheating on University Exams

During the month of September, over 500,000 high-school graduates in Sudan will be taking their university admission exams, and to discourage applicants from cheating mobile internet will be turned off nationwide for three hours every day.

Sudan has a long history of turning off its internet during protests in order to disrupt the coordination of participants, but this year it is using the internet shutdown as a measure to prevent “large scale cheating” during university admission exams. Yesterday, September 16, at 8 am sharp, the people of Sudan realized that despite having paid their bills on time, their mobile internet service wasn’t working. After receiving thousands of complaints, internet operators announced that the Government had ordered a daily mobile internet shutdown until September 24, as a way to discourage university applicants from cheating on exams.

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Aspiring Teachers Caught Cheating With Exam Answers Painted on Nails

Thirty-five young women were caught trying to cheat on their entrance exam into schools for teachers in the Mexican state of Michoacán; they allegedly had the correct answer pattern painted on their nails.

The entire admission process into teaching schools in Michoacán had been under suspicion of fraud since the first stage of exams, on the last day of July, when it was revealed that several of the students had bought the answers for 15,000 or 25,000 pesos. Although officially unproven, the claim was virtually confirmed by the astonishing test results in several Michoacán municipalities. According to Mexican media reports, 50 applicants who took the exam had answered all 100 question correctly, while another 300 had scores of 99 and 90 correct answers. This was unusual, as in other municipalities the highest score was 71 correct answers.

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Teacher Sparks Controversy for Making Students Wear Cardboard Boxes to Deter Cheating on Exam

A Mexican teacher has come under fire for making high-school students wear cardboard boxes on their heads to block their peripheral vision and prevent them from copying on an exam.

Luis Juárez Texis, the director of Campus 01 “El Sabinal” at the College of Bachelors, in the Mexican state of Tlaxcala, has been accused of humiliating and breaking the basic human rights of his students, after a photo of him overseeing an exam where the students wore cardboard boxes on their heads went viral online. The students’ parents shared the photo on social media and issued a public statement asking educational authorities in Mexico to dismiss Texis.

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