Pandemic Inspires Artist to Turn Artificial Fingernails Into Stunning Works of Art

A young  Vietnamese nail art expert who had to close down his business during the pandemic, used the time off to develop a stunning new kind of artificial fingernail art.

Le Dai Phat is recognized as one of the most talented nail artists in Ho Chi Minh City, and looking at his stunning hand-painted designs it’s easy to see why. From celebrity portraits to religion and Vietnamese culture-inspired designs, the 28-year-old artisan can create some truly impressive wearable artworks. But it was a new style he developed while quarantined at home because of Covid that really got people talking about him. Using up to 10 lined-up artificial fingernails, Phat is able to paint entire stories in the greatest of detail.

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The Body-Painted Illusions of Hikaru Cho

Hikaru Cho is a Tokyo-based body painter who specializes in surreal body art created using a combination of body paint and makeup.

Tokyo-based artist Hikaru Cho may only be 27-years-old, but she is already one of the most highly regarded body painters in the world, having worked with big brands like Samsung or Shiseido, and organizations like Amnesty International, among others. A graduate of Musashino Art University, Cho is one of the world’s most promising young body painters, and if her work so far is any indication, there’s a lot of impressive stuff to look forward to in the future.

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Tattoo Artist Specializes in Tattoos That Look Like Stickers

Canadian tattoo artist Luke Cormier has a very distinct art style – he creates colorful tattoos that look like stickers you can peel off of your skin.

Featuring all sorts of popular cartoon and video game characters, from Super Mario to the Powerpuff Girls or Rick and Morty, Luke Cormier’s tattoos are some of the most adorable we’ve ever seen. But what really makes his designs stand out is the sticker treatment. Complete with a white line, clever shading and realistic-looking creases, they look like actual stickers ready to peel off, even though they are inked with a tattoo gun.

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LEGO Madman Spends a Year Building Replica of Beijing’s Forbidden City Out of 700,000 Tiny Bricks

A Chinese LEGO enthusiast recently unveiled his most impressive project yet – a scale model of the Forbidden City in Beijing made out of 700,000 LEGO bricks.

The 4-meter-long by 2.4-meter-wide model of the Forbidden City was created by a Guangzhou-based LEGO fan named Li Zhining, over an entire year. It features all the elements of the world-famous palace complex, including the iconic Meridian Gate, the over 70 palaces and 9,000 houses of the three main halls of the Forbidden City, the moat and all the turrets. Even more impressive is the fact that the LEGO artist didn’t use any custom made bricks, instead relying only on his huge collection of standard pieces.

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Woodworker Creates the Most Amazing Wood Sculptures You’ll Ever See

A Japanese woodworker has developed a “three-dimensional wood inlay” technique that allows him to create exceptional artworks that require no coloring whatsoever.

From intricate carpets carved right into wood flooring, to whimsical furniture that looks warped and cracked, we’ve feature some awesome wood art over the years, but I think it’s safe to say that the creations of Japanese woodworker Toru Fukuda are on a whole other level than anything we’ve ever showed you before. The young craftsman garnered attention recently for his latest work, a simple wooden board with droplets of water on it. Only that water is actually wood that only looks like water. And that’s just one of the incredible creations Fukuda has produced, some of which look too good to be true.

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World’s First Invisible Sculpture Sells for a Whopping $18,000

An invisible sculpture created by Italian artist Salvatore Garau recently acquired by a private collector who paid a whopping 15,000 euros for it during an auction.

If you’re one of those people who just can’t understand how someone can pay large sums of money for digital assets like video game skins, accessories or increasingly popular non-fungible assets (NFTs), then the sale of Salvatore Garau’s immaterial sculpture is really going to do a number on your brain. Titled “I am” the invisible work of art basically represents a void, a technically empty space that is actually occupied by the energy of the sculpture. Sound like something you’d be interested in? No? Well, it’s too late anyway, as someone has already snatched it up by paying 12 thousand euros (15 thousand with auction rights) earlier this month.

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Man Eats Rotisserie Chicken, Preserves Skeleton as Museum Exhibit

A Japanese skeleton enthusiast recently got his five minutes of online fame after posting photos of an impressive chicken skeleton he managed to put together out of the bones of a rotisserie chicken he ate.

Mr. Kudo, a Japanese man who dreams of transforming his home into a museum-of-sorts filled with all sorts of animal skeletons, managed to wow millions of Twitter users with his latest creation – an almost perfect chicken skeleton assembled out of the bones of a rotisserie he himself gorged on. On April 28th, he took to Twitter to post before and after photos of a roasted chicken he had bought at a discount from a supermarket in Akita, Kanagawa Prefecture, a few weeks prior. The preserved chicken skeleton, showcased on the same disposable platter that came with the roasted dish, blew everyone away, and for good reason, it looked better than the specimens you see in most museums.

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Artist Turns Generic Figurines into Ultra-Realistic Sculptures of Anime Characters

A talented Japanese artist uses airbrushes and classic brushes to transform generic plastic figurines of popular anime characters into custom works of art.

The mysterious artist, who goes by MA Man on social media, specializes in taking commercially available figurines of popular anime series from series like Dragon Ball or JoJo’s Bizarre Adventure and giving them the custom treatment and turning them into awe-inspiring artworks. Ma Man uses both airbrushing and classic painting techniques to emphasize the figurine’s features, like their muscles or the creases of their clothes to make them look as cool and detailed as possible.

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The Insanely Realistic Airbrushed Portraits of Dru Blair

When it comes to hyperrealistic airbrushed portraits, you’ll have a tough time finding better works than those of South Carolina artist Dru Blair. His amazing paintings are virtually indistinguishable from photos.

Dru Blair first picked up the airbrush while working on his Master’s degree at the University of South Carolina, and spent several summers after that painting T-shirts in Myrtle Beach. Later, he worked as a freelance illustrator for several ad agencies and painted many novel covers, before developing an interest in techniques like photorealism, trompe l’oeil illusionism, faux finishing, and color theory. Today, he creates some of the most realistic airbrush portraits and teaches the secrets of the trade to other interested artists at his art school, aptly named School of Realism.

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Ukrainian Artist Creates the Most Realistic-Looking Ball-Jointed Dolls

Anastasia, a talented artist from the Ukraine, creates ball-jointed dolls so realistic-looking that you’d be forgiven for mistaking them for real, live girls.

The artist, who goes by “Elsyn” on Instagram, spends a lot of time making sure that every little detail on her amazing dolls is perfect. From the color of their skin, to the nails on their delicate fingers or the contour of their eyes and lips, they look nothing like the dolls you usually see on toy store shelves. But then again, these are not toys. For collectors, they are almost like living beings, and most of the people who get them end up naming them and making customs clothes for them as well.

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Why Dye Your Hair When You Can Have It Printed?

Barcelona-based stylist and hairdresser Alexis Ferrer has spent years developing a technique that allows him to digitally print colorful design onto human hair.

Alexis Ferrer started experimenting with hair printing in 2012, after being asked by haircare brand Wella Professionals to interpret a collection at that year’s International Trend Vision Awards. The aim was to “was to innovate with a technique not usually used in hairdressing,” and photographic printing on hair seemed like the perfect way to graphically tell a story. Ferrer’s first attempt managed to get a lot of attention in the world of fashion, and he has been working on refining hair printing techniques ever since.

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The Magical Pencil Drawings of Alessandro Paglia

When it comes ultra-realistic pencil drawings, you’d have a hard time finding someone better than Italian industrial designer turned artist Alessandro Paglia.

Having studying design at Politecnico di Milano, Alessandro Paglia managed to secure a job at 3M, working its first  international Design Center for five years. He then moved to a light design company and then to a brand design agency, but eventually realized that it wasn’t what he wanted to do in life. He had always been more fascinated by the artistic side of design, and his career was steering him further away from that. So one day Alessandro quit his job and decided to focus exclusively on artistic drawings, and we’re glad he did, because otherwise we would have probably never gazed upon his shiny masterpieces.

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Street Artist Creates Beautiful Drawings With Burning Logs and Rocks

A 23-year-old street artist from China has been getting a lot of praise for making use of simple yet intriguing drawing supplies to create some very impressive artworks.

Long Tsai has been trying to make himself known on Chinese social media by posting videos of himself drawing Chinese fantasy and TV series characters on the pavement. The problem is he is just one of the many self-taught artists around the world trying to make a name for themselves, so he decided to do that by using some unconventional tools. Instead of colored chalk or spray paint, he creates his art with a burning log for black and rocks or bricks for every other color.

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Bento Artist Creates Insanely Detailed Edible Portraits

A talented bento artist from Hiroshima, Japan, has been turning a lot of heads online with their incredibly detailed edible black portraits over a white rice background.

Nori bento is the most common forms of the portable Japanese snack, but one Japanese food artist has managed to turn the simplicity of the classic meal into an impressive art form. Miki Matsuura creates bento portraits so detailed it makes eating them a travesty. She carves the edible black layer so meticulously that the resulting portraits look almost drawn on the white rice with a black pencil, like manga characters. But while the artist posts photos of her art on social media, they aren’t made specifically for people’s entertainment, but as an actual lunch for Miki’s husband.

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The Photo-Like Ballpoint Pen Drawings of Mostafa Khodeir

Mostafa Khodeir, a talented young artist from Egypt, spends up to two months working on a single one of his ballpoint pen drawing, but the result of his labor is nothing short of awe-inspiring.

The first time that 28-year-old Mostafa Khodeir saw hyper-realistic ballpoint pen drawings, he was speechless, even though, in hindsight, the skill level of the artist was pretty low. He decided to try it for himself, so he started practicing, and after a while he started producing some truly impressive material. Khodeir can spent up to two months on certain drawings, but the result are always impressive.

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