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The Glowing Pencil Drawings of Enrique Bernal

The pencil drawings of Enrique ‘Kike’ Bernal would look good enough with that mysterious, colorful glow, but there is no denying that the added effect makes them that much more intriguing.

The young Mexican artist usually relies on mechanical pencils and pens to create his cartoonish drawings, but he recently incorporated a new, digital tool into his arsenal – Medibang Paint, an app that allows him to add artificial lighting to his drawings. He still has to make clever use of the colorful, almost fluorescent glow to nail the effect perfectly, so it’s not like anyone ca use it to create the same style of artworks. The mysterious glow only adds an extra layer of creativity to Bernal’s already excellent sketches and add a modern twist the to centuries-old art of portrait sketching.

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Retired Carpenter Goes Viral for His Whimsical Yet Functional Furniture

Warped or cracked furniture isn’t ideal, unless it’s that way by design, which is exactly what makes the whimsical cabinets of Henk Verhoeff so special.

The retired carpenter from Auckland, in New Zealand, went viral the other day, after his daughter started posting pictures of his amazing wooden cabinets on Facebook. At first glance, they look digitally altered to create the illusion of cracks or warps, but in reality they are designed and executed that way by hand. And what makes his creation even more special is that they continue to remain functional, despite their apparent defects; the drawers all open and close, and despite the reduced space, thousands have declared their willingness to pay just to have one of Henk Verhoeff’s wooden wonders in their homes.

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The Amazingly Realistic Paper Bird Sculptures of Diana Beltran Herrera

Colombian artist Diana Beltran Herrera creates incredibly realistic bird sculptures by carefully attaching bits of colored paper.

To say Diana Beltran Herrera’s hands are super-precise instruments would be an understatement. The talented artist uses her innate dexterity and years of practice to create amazingly-detailed models of various birds, from the common sparrow to tropical parrots, out of bits of glued paper. To represent the birds as they are in nature, Herrera makes her sculptures life-size. Over the last decade, she has created paper sculptures of hundreds of bird species.

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Japanese Art Student Creates Wearable Clothes Exclusively Out of Rubber Bands

Looking at the stylish garments made by graduating art student Rie Sakamoto, you’d be tempted to think they are made of brown yarn, but in fact, every piece in her collection is made of knitted rubber bands.

Rie Sakamoto is graduating from Tama Art University, in Tokyo this year and for her thesis she decided to focus on the humble but versatile rubber band. From a staple of office stationery to improvised wrist strap, the rubber band has literally hundreds of uses, but fabric for fashionable clothes most likely wasn’t one of them. But that was before Sakamoto got her hands on a few thousands of brown rubber bands and knitted them into dresses, bolero jackets, and more.

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California Couple Use GPS-Guided Lawn Mower to Create Stunning Tribute to Kobe Bryant

Tributes to Kobe Bryant have been flowing ever since the LA Lakers legend tragically lost his life in a helicopter crash last Sunday, but one in particular managed to catch a lot of attention because it was only visible from high up in the sky.

Kelli Pearson and her husband, Pete Davis, run New Ground Technology, a company that specializes in creating high-definition imagery on living grass, and they recently showcased their services with a beautiful portrait of late basketball star Kobe Bryant. The 115-foot tall and 92-foot wide mural of Bryant was executed the company’s patented Turfprinter technology in a grass field at a park in Pleasanton.

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Artist Carves 12,000 Holes into Chicken Egg, Sets New Record

Hamit Hayran, Turkey’s number one egg carving artist, recently set a new world record for the most number of holes carved into a single chicken egg, 12,000.

It’s hard to imagine how anyone could puncture a chicken egg, even a big one, tens of thousands of times, but 62-year-old Hamit Haryran is an expert at it. After becoming disabled in 1988, due to an occupational accident, he dedicated most of his time to egg-shell carving, and has since become one of the most celebrated egg carving artists in the world. Apart from creating some stunning artworks, he has also been actively chasing the record for most holes punctured into a single egg. He first broke it when he carved  8,708 holes, beating the record of a Pakistani artist, then with 11,827 holes, and this last time with a whopping 12,000.

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Marble Sculptor Makes the Most Uncomfortable Pillows

The fluffy pillows of Norwegian artist Håkon Anton Fagerås look perfect for smashing your face into after a long, hard day, but I wouldn’t recommend it, since they are carved out of white marble.

For thousands of years, blocks of marble have been carved into awe-inspiring artworks by some of the most talented sculptors in human history. It is perhaps the most used material in the history of art, and for good reason. There is a certain elegance, even a delicateness to it, qualities that help artists use it to express the nuances of human emotion, despite its rigid nature. These properties of marble inspired Håkon Anton Fagerås to sculpt the rock into something that would embody its qualities perfectly.

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Woman Spins Cat and Dog Fur into Textile Yarn as a Keepsake for Their Owners

45-year-old Theresa Furrer, a lifelong knitter and crocheter, is helping pet owners keep their beloved animals close to their hearts by knitting their hair into garments and accessories they can wear.

Theresa is part of a community of artists that specialize in a form of yarn spinning known as “chiengora”  – ‘chien’, the French word for dog, and ‘angora’, from the yarn spun from the soft belly fur of the angora rabbit. They basically take dog and cat hair and spin it into yarn that can subsequently be used to make soft clothing or accessories for grieving pet owners. The 45-year-old Pittsburgh woman says that she understands how some people might find her craft somewhat creepy or even gross, but she is not fazed by it at all.

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Russian Man Tries to Sell Childhood Painting for $2.3 Million

A Moscow man made national news headlines this week for putting a drawing he made when he was only six-years-old on sale online for no less than 140 million rubles ($2.3 million).

41-year-old journalist Vladimir Mkrtchyan placed the ad for his old childhood drawing on Russian classifieds site Avito on Monday, and it quickly went viral due to its exorbitant price. 140 million rubles seems kind of steep for a childish drawing, but the seller considers it’s worth twice that much, because it reflects the realities of the Soviet era through the innocent eyes of a six-year-old boy.

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Amazingly Talented Artist “Paints” with Layers of Denim

It’s hard saying goodbye to your favorite pair of jeans, even when they’re way beyond wearable, but English artist Ian Berry has found a way to avoid throwing away denim, by using it to create beautiful works of art.

Netherton-born artist Ian Berry, aka Denimu, has made quite a name for himself after his unique art took the art world by storm. It’s hard to believe the idea of using old denim as medium for his art came after a call from his mother, Christine, asking him to clean out his room.: “It was about six or seven years ago my mum was clearing out my old room and she wanted me to go through my things. I found loads of old jeans and denims and I noticed the different colors and shades. I kept hold of them but it was only about 18 months later I began to do something with them.” Little did he know his experiment would soon make him and his denim art famous all over the world.

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7-Year-Old “Preschool Picasso” Takes Art World by Storm

At just seven years of age, Mikail Akar is already a well-known name in the art world. His paintings sell for thousands of dollars all over the world, and he has already been given the nickname “Preschool Picasso”.

Born in Germany, Mikail’s talent for painting was discovered by mistake, three years ago. His parents bought him a canvas and some handprint paint and let him get creative with them. They has already bought him plenty of toys and action figures, so they thought they’d get him something different, but they definitely weren’t expecting him to paint a masterpiece. But Mikhail did such a good job with his first canvas that his father thought his wife had painted it.

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The Unbelievably Realistic Feline Drawings of Yuki Kudo

When it comes to hyper-realistic drawing, cats and other felines must be among the most difficult things to pull odd due to their fur. Getting every strand just right requires a steady hand and mountains of patience, and that’s what makes Yuki Kudo’s artworks so damn special.

Over the past decade, we’ve posted some pretty impressive hyper-realistic artworks on this website, so it takes some thing special to catch our attention. However, the first time I laid eyes on the color pencil drawings of Japanese artist Yuki Kudo, they took my breath away. I still find myself staring at some of his masterpieces, looking for clues that it’s just a drawing and not some digitally enhanced photo or CGI graphic. Oh, and did I mention he is only 18 years old?

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Sloppy-Looking Toothpaste Paintings on Bathroom Mirror Turn Into Masterpieces When the Lights Go Out

The first time people see Xiong Qingzhen’s toothpaste paintings, they’re not very impressed. Frankly, they look sloppy,, but then he flips the light switch in his bathroom and everyone’s jaws hit the floor…

Based in central China’s Hubei province, Xiong Qingzhen got the inspiration for his now famous toothpaste painting technique from his days taking photos with an old film camera. He found the way images on negatives were inverted in a dark room interesting, so one day he decided to apply a similar technique in the comfort of his own bathroom. Using the mirror as a canvas and plain toothpaste as paint, Xiong started painting “negative” portraits of popular celebrities. They didn’t look too impressive to the naked eye at first, but a simple flip of the switch revealed the true artwork.

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The Mind-Boggling Optical Illusions of Stefan Pabst

When it comes to ultra-realistic, hand-drawn or painted anamorphic illusions, you’d be hard pressed to find someone better than German artist Stefan Pabst. Just take a look at some of his work and you’ll be rubbing your eyes in amazement.

Born in Russia, Stefan Pabst has been living in Germany since he was 15-year-old. In 2007, he started painting and drawing portraits, but quickly got bored with it and began looking for a way to somehow traverse the 2D border of a sheet of paper. As he continued to explore the limits of his talent, Pabst stumbled upon the art of anamorphic illusions, and he hasn’t looked back since. Although he continues to create commission portraits, the German artist has become much more known for his mind-blowing optical illusions.

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Japanese Artist Creates Detailed Battleship Miniatures Out of Old Newspapers

Japanese visual artist Atsushi Adachi can make just about anything out of newspaper clippings, but his most impressive works yet are a series of miniature battleship replicas perfect to the tiniest of details.

We’ve seen people make impressive miniature models out of cardboard or matchsticks, but Atsushi Adachi finds newspapers to be the perfect medium. He considers them a sort of time machine, as they embody society’s values of that certain period, so by building models of various things using newspapers from that era, he is able to open a window into the past.

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